Joe Biden Wins 2020 Presidential Election: Live Updates

Joe Biden Wins 2020 Presidential Election: Live Updates

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Katie Glueck in Wilmington, Del.

President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.: “It’s time for America to unite. And to heal. We are the United States of America. And there’s nothing we can’t do, if we do it together.”

CNN on Saturday morning became the first television network to project that Joseph R. Biden Jr. will become America’s next president.

“After four long tense days, we’ve reached a historic moment in this election,” the anchor Wolf Blitzer announced at 11:24 a.m. “We can now project the winner of the presidential race.”

Shortly after CNN made the projection, other networks followed, including NBC, ABC and CBS. Fox News made the call at 11:40 a.m.

CNN’s projection came after Philadelphia officials provided results that were heavily skewed in Mr. Biden’s favor.

“We’re able to make this projection because CNN projects Biden wins Pennsylvania,” Mr. Blitzer said.

Throughout the morning, CNN had indicated a call could be coming. “We do think that there will be some resolution today,” Jake Tapper said about an hour before CNN made the call. “We do think there will be some indication of what the future will bring for the United States.”

Also that morning, CNN’s John King acknowledged that some viewers were frustrated that the call had not yet been made.

“We completely get the frustration and the anticipation out there,” he said, standing in front of an interactive map that showed Mr. Biden with a half a point lead over Mr. Trump in Pennsylvania. “It’s just important to have rules and not bend them, especially at a time the integrity of the system is being unfairly attacked by a candidate who, if he loses this state, is a one-term president.”

Katie Glueck headshot

 

Katie Glueck in Wilmington, Del.

A Biden statement, echoing themes he has pressed from the beginning: “With the campaign over, it’s time to put the anger and the harsh rhetoric behind us and come together as a nation.”

Stephanie Saul headshot

 

Stephanie Saul in New York

Northampton County, Pa., a working-class area that once was home to Bethlehem Steel, is living up to its reputation as a bellwether. Biden appears to have flipped the county blue.

See Pennsylvania results

Michael D. Shear headshot

 

Michael D. Shear in Washington

The Drudge Report, a conservative website that has not always been kind to President Trump, used the inevitable headline: “YOU’RE FIRED!”

Maggie Haberman headshot

The Trump campaign says it will continue with its legal challenges, even as most advisers realize it’s unlikely to change the outcome.

Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Kamala Harris, a senator from California and former presidential candidate, made history as she was elected vice president of the United States.

Her victory represents a handful of firsts: She will be the first woman, the first Black woman, the first Indian-American woman and the first daughter of immigrants to be sworn in as vice president.

It also marks a milestone for a nation in upheaval, grappling with a long history of racial injustice. Over the course of her campaign, Ms. Harris has faced both racist and sexist attacks from conservatives, including President Trump, who have refused to pronounce her name correctly.

The daughter of a Jamaican father and Indian mother, Ms. Harris, 56, brought to the race a more vigorous campaign style than that of the president-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr., including a gift for capturing moments of raw political electricity on the debate stage and elsewhere.

A former San Francisco district attorney, Ms. Harris was the first Black woman to serve as California’s attorney general. When she was elected a United States senator in 2016, she became only the second Black woman in that chamber’s history. In Washington, she made a name for herself with a withering prosecutorial style in Senate hearings.

As the vice-presidential nominee, Ms. Harris said she supports Mr. Biden’s positions — even some that differ from those she backed during the primary.

During the primary campaign, she struggled to attract the very Black voters and women she had hoped would connect with her personal story. During the general campaign, she made a concerted effort as Mr. Biden’s running mate to reach out to people of color, some of whom have said they felt represented in national politics for the first time.

Shane Goldmacher headshot

The tipping-point state for Joe Biden was Pennsylvania, the state where he was born, where he kicked off his campaign and where he spent the last days of the race.

Katie Glueck headshot

 

Katie Glueck in Wilmington, Del.

“Ecstatic — a great day for this country,” says Biden campaign manager Jennifer O’Malley Dillon, according to a pool report.

Nick Corasaniti headshot

 

Nick Corasaniti in Philadelphia

The newest vote totals in Pennsylvania give Biden a lead of 34,414 votes, outside of the automatic recount threshold.

See Pennsylvania results

Michael Grynbaum headshot

 

Michael Grynbaum in New York

Fox News was the last major TV network to call the election for Biden, at 11:40 a.m. It was the only network that did not have its A-list anchor team on the air at 11 a.m.

Michael D. Shear headshot

 

Michael D. Shear in Washington

Biden was declared the winner just over an hour after Trump declared on Twitter and Facebook: “I WON THIS ELECTION, BY A LOT!” Both companies warned that was premature.

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Adam Nagourney in Los Angeles

For all the nation’s divisions, Biden is on track to win a solid, even decisive election: a popular-vote margin of more than 4 million and potentially over 300 Electoral College votes.

Adam Nagourney headshot

 

Adam Nagourney in Los Angeles

Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s election as the 46th president comes after four polarizing years. He is taking over a country torn by a pandemic, an economic downturn and political strife.

Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

WILMINGTON, Del. — Joseph R. Biden Jr. has been elected president of the United States, defeating President Trump by promising to restore civility and stability to American politics and vowing more aggressively to combat the surging coronavirus pandemic.

Mr. Biden, 77, on Jan. 20 will become the 46th president and the oldest man ever sworn into the office. On Saturday, four days after Election Day, he secured the requisite 270 votes from the Electoral College.

The election, far closer than many experts had predicted, was history-making: Mr. Biden’s running mate, Senator Kamala Harris of California, is the first woman, and the first woman of color, on a winning presidential ticket.

Mr. Biden’s triumph concluded an extraordinary election that was expected to set modern records for turnout, despite being held amid a pandemic that has upended life across the United States and brought a new level of complexity to the voting process. Voters faced concerns about public health, long lines at the polls, and the vexing challenges of a transformed election system while rendering a verdict on Mr. Trump’s chaotic and norm-breaking presidency. In key battleground states, it took several days to process and count the flood of ballots sent through the mail.

In the end, the race was not the landslide many Democrats had hoped for. And the partisan wrangling is not over: the Trump campaign and Republican lawyers have already begun a wide-ranging legal assault to challenge Democratic votes and victories in swing states.

Michael Cooper headshot

 

Michael Cooper in New York

In New York City, as networks began to call the race, people cheered out their windows and banged pots — reminiscent of how they cheered essential workers early in the pandemic.

Michael Grynbaum headshot

 

Michael Grynbaum in New York

Fox News is now the only major TV network not to have called the presidential race for Joe Biden.

Michael D. Shear headshot

 

Michael D. Shear in Washington

Trump was at his golf club in Virginia this morning as several networks and The Associated Press projected that he had lost his bid for re-election just before 11:30 a.m.

Katie Glueck headshot

 

Katie Glueck in Wilmington, Del.

Minutes before TV networks called the race, Biden’s sister, Valerie Biden Owens, told us of this moment: “It’s wonderful. It’s a wonderful thing for us, but it’s a better thing for America.”

Credit…Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

The Associated Press and several major television networks reported on Saturday that Joseph R. Biden Jr. has won the presidency after defeating President Trump in Pennsylvania and clinching an Electoral College majority.

The New York Times is currently reviewing the The A.P.’s call and the vote data in the state.

The major TV networks — CNN, NBC News, ABC News, CBS News and Fox News — have also called the race for Mr. Biden. Fox News was the last TV network to call the race, at around 11:40 a.m.

The New York Times headshot

The Associated Press said Joe Biden had defeated President Trump in Pennsylvania and won the presidency. The Times is now reviewing The A.P.’s call.

Katie Glueck headshot

 

Katie Glueck in Wilmington, Del.

At the Westin hotel in Wilmington, where the Biden team has set up shop, CNN is blaring and just called Pennsylvania, and the race, for Joe Biden.

Credit…Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

As vote counting continues in the 2020 election, many of the most-watched states that could decide the presidential race still have stacks of provisional ballots that have yet to be assessed.

Provisional ballots (also referred to in some states as “affidavit ballots”) are used when a person cannot be verified as eligible to vote at a particular polling place. In some cases, they are used because a registered voter has come to the wrong precinct. They are also sometimes used when a person’s information does not match the information on voter registration lists, or when a voter does not bring a locally required form of identification.

Some states also require the use of a provisional ballot when a voter who had requested an absentee or mail ballot shows up to vote in person — a group that may be larger this year because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Provisional ballots require extra work on the part of election officials, who must make sure they are eligible to be counted, so they typically take longer to tally. Provisional ballots typically make up a fairly small percentage of the total votes cast in a given election, and outlets have in the past called races without waiting for them to be tallied.

But with tight races in a number of states, election analysts this year are looking more closely at the number of provisional ballots still to be counted in key states.

Officials in Pennsylvania, where fewer than 30,000 votes currently separate President Trump and Joe Biden, have said they could have close to 100,000 such ballots. In Nevada, where the margin is 22,000, the state’s most populous county said on Friday it had more than 60,000 provisional ballots to process.

Nick Corasaniti headshot

 

Nick Corasaniti in Philadelphia

In Pennsylvania, an automatic recount is triggered when the margin is less than 0.5 percent of the total, which would currently be 33,674. At the moment, Biden’s lead is 30,908.

See Pennsylvania results

Jennifer Medina headshot

 

Jennifer Medina in Phoenix

The latest batch of Maricopa County votes was somewhat better for Trump than other recent batches, which means he closed the gap more than many observers expected.

See Arizona results

PHOENIX — The scene was calm on Saturday morning at the tabulation site near downtown Phoenix where Maricopa County employees were continuing to count ballots.

The county, by far the largest in the state, released around 11 a.m. Eastern Saturday what officials said was the last large release of results, and they had Joseph R. Biden Jr. firmly ahead, with the former vice president receiving 50 percent of the votes tallied, compared to 48 percent for President Trump.

At the site, only two demonstrators were standing in the parking lot where protests, some involving armed supporters of President Trump, have unfolded several times this week.

One of the men at the site was Franklyn Olivieri, 50, a Brooklyn-born construction worker who has lived in Arizona for more than two decades. “We just want a fair count,” Mr. Olivieri said. “If it needs to go to the courts, go to the courts.”

The other man held an American flag and said he had come to the site as a single-issue voter, adding that he was “pro-life.” The man declined to give his name, saying he was an employee of the Department of Defense and did not have authorization to speak publicly

Both of the men said they hoped a protest scheduled for later on Saturday would be peaceful. In recent days, armed protesters at the site threatened journalists.

Authorities have since set up a barrier in front of the building that separates protesters from an area where television crews can broadcast updates on the counting process.

Michael Cooper headshot

 

Michael Cooper in New York

With the most recent release of votes in Arizona, Biden’s lead in the state now stands at 20,573 votes.

See Arizona results

Jennifer Medina headshot

 

Jennifer Medina in Phoenix

This is the first time Maricopa County voters chose a Democrat for president in more than 70 years. My colleagues reported on one of the biggest political shifts in the country:

Read more

In the six states where the presidential race has yet to be called by The New York Times, all eyes, and headlines, are on the election.

Jennifer Medina headshot

 

Jennifer Medina in Phoenix

Biden is still firmly ahead in Maricopa County (Phoenix), receiving about 50 percent of the votes tallied in the county, compared with 48 percent for Trump.

See Arizona results

Jennifer Medina headshot

 

Jennifer Medina in Phoenix

Arizona’s Maricopa County, by far the largest in the state, has just released what officials say is the last large report of tallied votes.

See Arizona results

Nate Cohn headshot
Trump wins the new Maricopa vote by 15.6 points. Still not good enough for him. Still not going to yield a projection, I don’t think.

See Arizona results

As votes continue to be counted in Pennsylvania, whose 20 electoral votes could put Joseph R. Biden Jr. over the threshold for the presidency, President Trump’s campaign is planning a news conference in Philadelphia on Saturday morning.

It was not immediately clear what the topic of the news conference would be, though the Trump campaign has pursued lawsuits in Pennsylvania, including one over the position of election observers in a vote-counting center in Philadelphia. Rudy Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, was scheduled to be at the news conference along with Pam Bondi, the former Florida attorney general, and Corey Lewandowski, a senior campaign adviser.

Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter that the news conference would be held at a landscaping business in Philadelphia at 11:30 a.m.

The business, Four Seasons Total Landscaping, says on its Instagram that it is a “woman-owned, minority business,” and offers a motto: “Trying to make America green again!” (The business is certified as a woman-owned enterprise by Philadelphia’s Office of Economic Opportunity.)

The business and its owner did not immediately respond to phone calls on Saturday morning.

Nate Cohn headshot
Biden keeps inching closer to victory. He now leads in states worth over 300 electoral votes. So why hasn’t the race for president been called?

Read more

Credit…Anne Raup/Anchorage Daily News, via Associated Press

As of Saturday morning, only 56 percent of Alaska voters’ ballots had been counted, less than in any other state.

There is little question about who will take the state’s three electoral votes — President Trump is leading, and the state has voted for a Republican in every presidential election since 1964 — but its slow count has put Alaska in league with the five states where close races have kept most news outlets from projecting a winner (Pennsylvania, Georgia, Arizona, Nevada and North Carolina).

Two factors seem to be responsible for the slow count: the state’s late deadline for mailed absentee ballots and a process of ensuring that voters do not vote twice.

Alaska allows absentee ballots to arrive up to 10 days after Election Day for most voters, as long as they are postmarked by Election Day.

Election officials also must wait for paper voter history records to be mailed from precincts to make sure no one votes twice. Only then can the ballots from a precinct be opened and counted, Tiffany Montemayor, a spokeswoman for the state’s election division, said in an email.

“Given the geographic expanse of Alaska, this does take some time,” she said.

Credit…Eric Thayer for The New York Times

There was one subset of the political world that felt vindicated by the nail-biter presidential race: Democrats who worked for Hillary Clinton. The closeness of the Biden-Trump race suggests that the 2016 election outcome may have been less about Mrs. Clinton’s political weaknesses than it was about Mr. Trump’s political strengths.

In some of the states that Mr. Biden managed to flip, like Wisconsin, his victory was by a slim margin of about 20,000 votes. Four years ago, Mrs. Clinton lost the state by about 22,000. A potential victory with more than 300 electoral votes would look like a blowout for Mr. Biden, but it would also mask the fact that in some of the most critical states, the race was still only won by a hair.

Mr. Biden has not received the wide margins nationwide that many liberals had been hoping for. The silver lining for some former members of Clintonworld, as one put it: The 2016 Democratic nominee might not go down in history as the political version of Bill Buckner, who blew the World Series for the Red Sox in 1986 by letting a ground ball go through his legs.

“His electoral strength in 2016 had less to do with any shortcomings of Hillary Clinton as a candidate or of her campaign than with Trump’s own appeal to a broad segment of the population,” Stuart Appelbaum, president of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union and a member of the D.N.C.’s executive committee, said of Mr. Trump. “We need as Democrats to understand that and confront it more effectively going forward.”

Philippe Reines, a former top adviser to Mrs. Clinton both in the Senate and at the State Department, was even more blunt. “Hillary’s owed more than a few apologies for how her campaign was assessed,” Mr. Reines said. Jennifer Palmieri, who served as communications director for the 2016 Clinton campaign, said that the current election gives a new perspective to the race four years ago.

“There’s only so much you can do to ameliorate larger forces,” Ms. Palmieri said. “When I see young Latino and African-American men siding with Trump in a way they didn’t in 2016, I don’t fault the Biden campaign’s African-American radio program. It is a symptom of a larger change that’s happening.”

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Large groups of demonstrators gathered outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center Friday night as the Democratic presidential nominee Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s lead increased in the battleground state.CreditCredit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

No state was attracting as much attention Saturday morning as Pennsylvania, where Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s campaign hoped further counting could push their lead above 0.5 percent, obviating the need for a mandatory recount there and potentially setting the stage for television networks to declare Mr. Biden the winner in the state and, as a result, the president-elect.

In Allegheny County, a predominantly Democratic area that includes Pittsburgh, election workers were tallying roughly 20,000 mail-in ballots and another 17,000 provisional ballots on Saturday, Rich Fitzgerald, the county executive, said in a morning televised interview.

The county’s mail-in ballots have so far overwhelmingly supported Mr. Biden, as have the provisional ballots. He said the county could begin reporting votes by the late morning or early afternoon. With 96 percent of votes reported by 7:30 a.m. Eastern time, Mr. Biden led in Pennsylvania by nearly 29,000 votes. The size of the lead — approaching 0.5 percent — was crucial because the state automatically holds a recount for votes within that margin.

Remaining mail-in ballots are expected to widen Mr. Biden’s lead and potentially make him the winner of a state whose 20 electoral votes would vault him past the 270 needed to become the next president.

Mr. Fitzgerald cautioned that the last ballots to be counted would be the trickiest, requiring additional checks to ensure they are not duplicates, which could delay the tally. Responding to baseless allegations by the Trump campaign of vote-counting secrecy, he said that observers and journalists had access to the vote-counting site and that there were as many surveillance cameras there as in a casino.

Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

By Saturday morning on the east coast, Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s lead in Georgia had surpassed 7,000 votes, but the race there and in some other key states that could decide the next president remained uncalled. In a brief speech late on Friday night, Mr. Biden expressed confidence that he would prevail.

With some, but not all, of the pivotal counties planning to report the count of additional ballots on Saturday, there was an expectation that a winner could be declared soon. But when that might happen is still unclear.

Here’s where things stand in the four key states where additional results could come on Saturday.

  • Arizona: Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, is expected to post its next report on Saturday at 11 a.m. Eastern. Officials there said nearly all of their early ballots would be counted by that point, and only a smaller number of provisional and other ballots would remain. Mr. Biden led President Trump in the state by 29,861 votes early Saturday.

  • Georgia: The secretary of state said on Friday that because of the small margin between the presidential candidates, a recount would be inevitable. Mr. Biden widened his lead slightly overnight, to over 7,000, but a recount remains no less likely.

  • Nevada: Numbers continue to favor Mr. Biden, who leads by 22,657 votes. Officials in Clark County, where tens of thousands of ballots are left to count, plan to release results twice a day going forward.

  • Pennsylvania: Mr. Biden leads President Trump. The remaining mail ballots are expected to favor Democrats, and some counties could report updated results on Saturday. Philadelphia officials said the count there could take a few more days to complete.

Credit…Eric Baradat/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

As Day 4 of the United States election turned into Day 5 on Saturday, the race for president appeared to slow to a crawl.

The news anchor Don Lemon read text messages from his friends about the Georgia count aloud on CNN. Foreign newspapers wrote about the unchanged overnight tally with a hint of exasperation. On a livestream of Philadelphia’s vote-counting site, boxes sat behind fences and not a single person stirred.

“New results out of Georgia,” Britain’s Guardian newspaper reported early Saturday, “and — they just basically say the same thing.”

Saturday morning could yet bring decisive news: Pennsylvania could move out of recount territory if the margin widens, and Arizona and Nevada were expected to declare new votes. But whereas 24 hours earlier, all-night ballot counting had given Joseph R. Biden Jr. the lead in Georgia, the early hours of Saturday seemed comparatively sedate. Nothing was changing, and nobody was quite sure when it would.

“It feels like just one long day,” Mr. Lemon said.





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