AgweekTV Full Show: Vaccine optimism, SDFB convention, one-room schoolhouse, potato friends

AgweekTV Full Show: Vaccine optimism, SDFB convention, one-room schoolhouse, potato friends

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PROMISING COVID VACCINE NEWS PROVIDES OPTIMISM IN THE AG MARKET PLACE.

Michelle: We’ll look at ag policy from the South Dakota Farm Bureau Convention.>

Katie Pinke: We’ll take you to a preserved on room schoolhouse that students are still utilizing>

AND WE PROFILE THREE POWERFUL PLAYERS IN THE REGION’S POTATO BUSINESS.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I’M MICHELLE ROOK.

POSITIVE NEWS ABOUT A COVID VACCINE CONTINUES TO PROVIDE OPTIMISM TO THE AG MARKET PLACE. THIS WEEK ASTRA ZENECA, JOINED PFIZER AND MODERNA WITH EFFECTIVE TRIAL NEWS, WHILE THE TIME TABLE FOR VACCINE DISSEMINATION WAS MOVED UP TO DECEMBER.

PLUS, THE CDC SAYS FOUR GROUPS ARE IN LINE FOR EARLY VACCINATIONS IF SUPPLY IS LIMITED. THESE INCLUDE WORKERS IN ESSENTIAL INDUSTRIES SUCH AS MEAT PACKING PLANTS. THIS IS GOOD NEWS SINCE CONSUMERS ARE STILL SUFFERING FROM FOOD INSECURITY.

SOUTH DAKOTA’S LT. GOVERNOR SAYS THAT’S LED TO MORE CONSUMERS TURNING TO LOCAL PROCESSORS.

Lt. Gov. Larry Rhoden: I think it’s a great point. And I think that kind of highlights where we’re at right now with expanding the ability of our processors to provide more security on the local level.

HE SAYS THE STATE IS WORKING TO EXPAND SMALL PROCESSORS THROUGH GRANTS AND LEGISLATION TO ALLOW STATE INSPECTED MEAT PLANTS TO SELL ACROSS STATE LINES. RHODEN SPOKE AT THE SOUTH DAKOTA FARM BUREAU ANNUAL MEETING.

FARM BUREAU MEMBERS ALSO GOT AN UPDATE ON THE 2020 ELECTION AT THE CONVENTION. I ASKED STATE PRESIDENT SCOTT VANDERWAL ABOUT WHAT THE NEW BIDEN ADMINISTRATION MEANS FOR AGRICULTURE.

Scott VanderWal: I’D START OUT BY TALKING ABOUT THE PAST FOUR YEARS BASICALLY AND WE’VE HAD SOME REALLY GOOD THINGS HAPPEN UNDER PREIDENT TRUMP AND YOU KNOW, ROLLING BACK REGULATONS AND THE TRADE DEALS AND SOME OF THOSE KIND OF THINGS. LOOKING AHEAD TO A BIDEN ADMINISTRATION, WHICH APPARENTLY WE’RE GOING TO HAVE, COULD BE SOME CHALLENGES COMING FORWARD BECAUSE THERE ARE SOME FOLKS THAT MAY BE ACTIVE IN THE BIDEN ADMINISTRATION THAT WOULD BE DIFFERENT THAN OUR POLICY WOULD ALLOW. BUT WE’RE CERTAINLY INTERESTED IN WORKING WITH THEM ON AS MANY THINGS AS WE CAN.

SCOTT, WE’VE HEARD A FEW NAMES IN TERMS OF SECRETARY OF ARICULTURE CANDIDATES. HEITKAMP, AS WELL AS MARCIA FUDGE. WHAT ARE YOU HEARING?

Scott VanderWal: WE’VE HEARD SEVERAL NAMES. KRISTA HARDIN WOULD BE ANOTHER ONE WHO WAS ACTIVE IN THE USDA UNDER PRESIDENT OBAMA. SHE WOULD BE GOOD. WE’LL BE WEIGHING IN WITH OUR THOUGHTS ON THAT, BECAUSE THAT POITION IS HUGELY IMPORTANT TO AGRCULTURE, AND OBVIOUSLY TO OUR ENTIRE COUNTRY FROM A FOOD STANDPOINT.

AND WHAT ABOUT EPA ADMINISTRATOR? DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR SECRETARY? THOSE ARE IMPORTANT POSITIONS AS WELL, AREN’T THEY, FOR AGRICULTURE?

Scott VanderWal: LOOKING AHEAD, YES, THE EPA ADMINISTRATOR AND INTERIOR ARE VERY VERY CRUCIAL TO AGRICULTURE AND REALLY AFFECTS WHAT WE DO, ESPECIALLY FROM A REGULATORY STANDPOINT. IT’S A FINANCIAL BURDEN IN CASES AND WITH THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION THEY LIFTED SOME OF THAT. AND SO WE’LL BE LOOKING TO ALSO MINIMIZE THOSE.

AND WHAT KIND OF AGENDA ARE YOU GOING TO BE LOOKING AT FOR AGRICULTURE UNDER THE NEW CONGRESS?

Scott VanderWal: WELL CERTAINLY WE’D BE FALLING BACK ON SOME THINGS THAT WE’VE BEEN WORKING ON. AG LABOR REFORM, IMMIGRATION REFORM IS ONE REALLY BIG ONE. HAVEN’T BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN GETTING THAT THROUGH THE LAST FEW CONGRESSES YET, MAYBE IN THIS NEXT ONE WE’LL FIND SOME RECEPTIVE PEOPLE. BROADBAND AVAILABILITY TO EVERYBODY ACROSS THE NATION IS HUGE FOR US, THAT’S RIGHT AT THE TOP OF OUR PRIORITY LIST. AND THEN ALSO NRCS REFORM, TRYING TO BE MORE FAIR WITH LANDOWNERS IN TERMS OF WETLANDS REGULATIONS AND DETERMINATONS.>

HE SAYS THEY HOPE THE SENATE REMAINS IN REPUBLICAN CONTROL TO KEEP A BALANCE OF POWER.

THANKSGIVING LOOKED DIFFERENT THIS YEAR DUE TO COVID. HOWEVER A FARM BUREAU SURVEY INDICATES CONSUMERS COULD BE THANKFUL FOR AN AFFORDABLE MEAL.

In fact, the annual study shows the cost of this year’s Thanksgiving meal was the lowest in a decade.

John Newton: The average price of the Thanksgiving dinner with all the fixings, including stuffing, sweet potatoes and pumpkin pie came in at $46.90, that was down 4-percent from last year and the lowest that we’ve seen since 2010.

The only increases were in the price of bread and stuffing, but that was offset by the centerpiece of the meal.

Newton: This year the turkey price came in at $1.21 per pound that was down 7% from last year, and that helps to make this meal so affordable.

Which was welcome with more Americans cooking at home this Thanksgiving.

Newton: And you know, give thanks for what’s been a pretty tough year and hopefully brighter year in front of us.

THE SALE OF A LIVESTOCK FEED BUSINESS IN OUR REGION HAS RAISED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE RULES FOR COMMERCIAL FEED SALES.

THERE ARE REGULATIONS FOR SUCH OPERATIONS, BUT AS MIKKEL PATES FINDS, THEY CAN INVOLVE JUDGEMENT CALLS.

BOB BJORNSTAD HAS BEEN SELLING LIVESTOCK FEED MADE FROM PASTA WASTE FOR 35 YEARS. HE STARTED THE WORK AS A SIDELINE WHEN HE WORKED AS A MILLER AT THE NOODLES BY LEONARDO PLANT IN CANDO, NORTH DAKOTA, AND CARRIED IT ON AT DAKOTA GROWERS PASTA IN CARRINGTON WHEN HE WENT TO WORK THERE. THE PLANTS WANTED TO GET RID OF WASTE AND DOUGH PIECES THAT OTHERWISE WOULD GO TO A LANDFILL. BJORNSTAD BOUGHT IT AND EITHER FED IT OR SOLD IT TO OTHER LIVESTOCK ENTERPRISES.

Bob Bjornstad: THEY WERE HAVING TROUBLE GETTING RID OF IT HERE, THEY WERE TRYING TO GIVE IT AWAY.

BJORNSTAD WAS ABLE TO SELL IT CHEAPER THAN CORN FEED, MAKING IT A GOOD DEAL FOR HIM, AND HIS CUSTOMERS. ONE CUSTOMER WAS KORBY KOST, A CATTLE FEEDLOT OPERATOR AT CARRINGTON.

Bob Bjornstad: WE’VE SOLD HIM A LOT OF FEED, NEVER A COMPLAINT.

THAT IS, UNTIL KOST FOUND OUT BJORNSTAD HAD SOLD THE BUSINESS TO BEN AND ASHLEY DOELING.

Ben Doeling: WE’D BEEN KIND OF WANTING A FARM FOR A LONG TIME, AND WE JUST HAPPENED TO BE BROWSING ONLINE AND WE SEEN ONE HERE IN CARRINGTON.

KOST TOLD BJORNSTAD HE HAD WANTED TO BUY THE FEED BUSINESS, INSTEAD OF THE DOELINGS, BUT THE DEAL HAD BEEN DONE. KOST ASKED THE AG DEPARTMENT FOR A CEASE AND DESIST ORDER AGAINST THE DOELINGS, CLAIMING THEY WERE OPERATING WITHOUT A LICENSE OR A CERTIFIED SCALE. BEN DOELING SAYS HE WAS SURPRISED ABOUT THE LICENSE REQUIREMENT BUT IMMEDIATELY APPLIED FOR ONE WITH THE HELP OF THE NORTH DAKOTA AG DEPARTMENT.

Ben Doeling: THEY WERE GOING TO LOOK INTO IT AS FAR AS TO SEE IF WE NEEDED A LICENSE OR NOT, AND ULTIMATELY WE JUST DECIDED, BEFORE THEY DECIDED, WE WERE JUST GOING TO GET ONE ANYWAY.

DOELING IS IN THE PROCESS OF FINDING MORE CUSTOMERS. HE SAYS HE’D LIKE TO KEEP DOING BUSINESS WITH KOST, BUT AT THIS POINT, THE TWO HAVEN’T HAD ANY CONTACT. IN CARRINGTON, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

A LONGTIME FIXTURE FOR LIVESTOCK BUYERS AND SELLERS IS HISTORY.

CENTRAL LIVESTOCK HAS HELD ITS LAST AUCTION AT THE WEST FARGO STOCKYARDS.

SALES WERE HELD WEEKLY FOR 85 YEARS. BUT THE PROPERTY IS BEING SOLD, AND DEVELOPERS PLAN TO BUILD SOMETHING NEW.

THE STOCKYARDS ARE AN IMPORTANT PART OF WEST FARGO’S HISTORY. THE FORMER ARMOUR AND COMPANY MEAT PACKING PLANT MADE IT A PRIME LOCATION FOR THE UNION STOCKYARDS TO BUILD THERE IN 1935.

CENTRAL LIVESTOCK OF SAINT PAUL BOUGHT THE STOCKYARDS IN 1988.

Katie Pinke: Coming up on Agweek TV, we’ll flash back to the way farm kids used to go to school.

POTATOES ARE A POWERFUL BUSINESS IN THE NORTHERN RED RIVER VALLEY. AND THREE MEN ARE MAJOR PLAYERS IN THE POTATO BUSINESS.

THEY ALSO HAPPEN TO BE CLOSE FRIENDS WHO WORK CLOSELY TOGETHER TO KEEP THE INDUSTRY STRONG. MIKKEL PATES TALKS TO ALL THREE, IN THIS WEEK’S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Mike Delisle: THERE USED TO BE A BILLBOARD THAT SAID “POTATO CAPITOL OF THE WORLD”. AT ONE TIME THERE WERE 250 GROWERS HERE AT EAST GRAND FORKS ALONE.

GREGG HALVERSON GROWS POTATOES, MIKE DELISLE MAKES THE EQUIPMENT TO HANDLE THEM, AND JOHN BOTSFORD SPECIALIZES IN AG REAL ESTATE. THEIR FRIENDSHIP GOES BACK DECADES, EVEN GENERATIONS, AND THEY SAY THAT STRONG BOND MAKES THEIR BUSINESSES STRONGER.

John Botsford: I THINK WE’RE ALL A BIT INNOVATIVE AND ENTREPRENEURIAL BY SPIRIT IN OUR OWN OPERATIONS, AND I KNOW THESE TWO GUYS ARE PERFECTIONISTS AND I MIGHT BE CLOSE MYSELF.

GREGG HALVERSON’S GRANDFATHER STARTED FARMING WITH TEN ACRES OF POTATOES IN 1928. AND HIS FAMILY HAS GROWN POTATOES EVER SINCE. TODAY, HALVERSON IS CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF BLACK GOLD FARMS. IT’S BASED IN GRAND FORKS, AND HAS POTATO FARMING INTERESTS IN ABOUT ELEVEN STATES.

Gregg Halverson: FARMING IS OUR CORE BUSINESS, AND POTATOES IS OUR SPECIALTY, AND THAT’S KIND OF WHAT, IT’S WHAT WE DO.

MIKE DELISLE’S FATHER AND GRANDFATHER STARTED MAYO MANUFACTURING, MAKING POTATO HANDLING EQUIPMENT IN EAST GRAND FORKS IN 1952. AS FARMS GOT BIGGER, SO DID THEIR EQUIPMENT, AND SO DID THE FAMILY BUSINESS. BUT HE SAYS HIS TWO FRIENDS HAVE ADDED TO HIS SUCCESS.

Mike Delisle: THOSE GUYS ARE SHARP. I’VE THINK I’VE PROBABLY LEARNED MORE FROM THEM THAN THEY HAVE FROM ME.

WITH THE RAPID PACE OF AG INNOVATION, THESE THREE RELY ON EACH OTHER TO HELP KEEP UP.

Gregg Halverson: IT CHANGES SO FAST, AND IF YOU DON’T KEEP UP TO THOSE CHANGES, YOU CAN GET LEFT IN THE DUST IN NO TIME FLAT. AND I THINK ONE THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS MAYBE IS THE ABILITY TO BE FLEXIBLE.

WHILE NONE OF THESE FRIENDS HAVE ANY IMMEDIATE PLANS TO RETIRE, THEY LOOK FORWARD TO LEAVING STRONG, HEALTHY AG BUSINESSES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION. IN GRAND FORKS, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES FOR AGWEEK.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

A FORMER ONE ROOM COUNTRY SCHOOL HOUSE IS STILL BEING USED TO TEACH KIDS. BUT IN A VERY DIFFERENT WAY THAN IT USED TO.

FOR MORE, HERE’S AGWEEK PUBLISHER KATIE PINKE.

DANTON SCHOOL IN RICHLAND COUNTY, NORTH DAKOTA, WAS OPEN FROM THE LATE 1800’S UNTIL THE 1960’S.

A FEW YEARS AGO, IT WAS MOVED INTO TOWN AND TURNED INTO A MUSEUM AND INTERPRETIVE CENTER.

I VISITED IT, AND TALKED WITH SOME FORMER STUDENTS.

Janell Meslow: I WAS IN FIRST GRADE TO THE FOURTH GRADE WHEN I WENT HERE. I WAS THE SMARTEST ONE IN THE CLASS, BECAUSE I WAS THE ONLY ONE IN THE CLASS.

IT’S BEEN ABOUT SIXTY YEARS SINCE JANELL MESLOW SAT IN THIS DESK, BUT HER MEMORIES OF HER DANTON SCHOOL DAYS ARE STILL STRONG. AND THEY’RE WARM, EVEN ABOUT THE COLD WEATHER…

Janell Meslow: IN THE WINTER, WHEN IT WAS COLDER, THE PARENTS FELT WE NEEDED SOMETHING WARM DURING THE DAY. SO FAMILIES WOULD TAKE TURS BRINGING A HOT DISH OR SOMETHING, SETTING IT BACK ON THE REGISTER TO KEEP IT WARM UNTIL IT WAS NOON. IT WAS KIND OF HARD BECAUSE WE COULD SMELL THAT GOOD FOOD ALL MORNING.

THE COUNTRY USED TO BE DOTTED WITH THESE SMALL SCHOOLS EVERY FEW MILES, SO FARM KIDS COULD WALK OR RIDE HORSES TO SCHOOL. BUT FOR THE MOST PART, THEY ARE JUST MEMORIES TODAY. THIS MUSEUM HOPES TO KEEP THE MEMORIES ALIVE FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS.

Erica Illies: WHEN I TEACH MY EARLY SETTLEMENT UNIT I LIKE TO BRING THEM TO EXPERIENCE WHAT THOSE KIDS WOULD GO THROUGH.

TODAY ERICA ILLIES HAS BROUGHT HER FIFTH GRADE CLASS TO THE SCHOOL, TO LEARN SOME HISTORY, AND EXPERIENCE A BIT OF WHAT LIFE WAS LIKE FOR THE GENERATIONS WHO CAME BEFORE THEM.

Erica Illies: IT’S JUST A GREAT WAY FOR THEM TO SEE THE GROWTH THAT THERE HAS BEEN AND AND THE CHANGE THERE HAS BEEN IN EDUCATION AND USUALLY THEY’RE PRETTY THANKFUL FOR THE SITUATION THAT THEY HAVE IN SCHOOL.

ILLIES SAYS NOT ONLY DO THEY LEARN HISTORY, THEY LEARN TO APPRECIATE TECHNOLOGY, AND MODERN CONVENIENCES THEY TAKE FOR GRANTED. LIKE INDOOR PLUMBING.

Katie Pinke: These toilets are original in that there used to be bumps, outdoor toilets inside. Now, we have real toilets.

VIRGINIA GOERGER’S HUSBAND ALSO ATTENDED THE SCHOOL, AND HATED SEEING IT FALLING INTO DISREPAIR. SO SHE SPEARHEADED THE EFFORT TO MOVE AND RESTORE IT. SHE SAYS IT HOLDS MANY IMPORTANT LESSONS THAT SHOULDN’T BE FORGOTTEN.

Virginia Goerger: TO VALUE THE SIMPLE THINGS OF LIFE AND HOW WE HAVE GROWN INTO WHAT WE ARE TODAY.

ALTHOUGH TABLETS HAVE GONE FROM CHALK, TO ELECTRONIC, THE STUDENTS THEN LEARNED LASTING LESSONS.

I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG

Janell Meslow: WE SURVIVED, WE HAD CLOSER BONDS, I THINK. WE DIDN’T NEED ALL THE EXTRA PLUSES TO BE HAPPY.

TO VISIT THE DANTON SCHOOL, FOLLOW THE CONTACT INFORMATION ON THE SCREEN OR LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS STORY ON AGWEEK.COM

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, ONE OF THE REGION’S BIGGEST SHORTLINE MACHINERY DEALERSHIP IS GETTING READY TO SHOW OFF ITS NEW FACILITY TO THE PUBLIC.

THE WEATHER WAS SOMETHING TO BE THANKFUL FOR THIS HOLIDAY WITH NO MAJOR STORMS HITTING THE REGION. BUT WHAT’S AHEAD FOR DECEMBER?

HERE’S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

WELCOME BACK. WE’RE HERE AT NORTH STAR AG, JOINING US IS ZANE ERICKSON AND ZANE, LET’S TALK ABOUT WHO NORTH STAR AG IS.

Zane Erickson: SO WE’RE A FULL SERIVCE SHORTLINE MACHINERY DEALERSHIP SALES, PARTS AND SERVICE AT OUR NEW LOCATION AT TOWER CITY.

SO HOW MANY BRANDS DO YOU REPRESENT?

Zane Erickson: WE DO A TOTAL OF 25, WITH A MAIN CORE OF 7. THE ONES THAT WE SPECIALIZE IN, WE TYPICALLY HAVE THE LARGEST INVENTORY AS WELL AS PARTS AND AVAILABILITY IN THE REGION.

SO TALK ABOUT WHAT MAKES YOU UNIQUE. ONE THING THAT STANDS OUT TO ME IS THAT YOU ARE A FIFTH GENERATION FARMER.

Zane Erickson: YEAH, YUP. SO I GREW UP ON A FARM SO WE UNDERSTAND WHAT THE VALUE IS OF THE PRODUCT, AND HOW THAT WORKS FOR THE FARM. IT REALLY IS A FULL FOCUS APPROACH TO THE CUSTOMER.

SO YOU’RE NOT JUST PROVIDING OR SELLING A PRODUCT THEN, YOU’RE TRYING TO PROVIDE A SOLUTION FOR THEM.

Zane Erickson: CORRECT, YUP. I WOULD SAY WE TAKE A SOLUTION BASED APPROACH IN EVERYTHING WE DO.

SO ALSO TALK ABOUT THIS NEW FACILITY THAT WE’RE IN. THIS IS VERY INDICATIVE OF THE GROWTH THAT YOU’VE SEEN IN THIS COMPANY, RIGHT?

Zane Erickson: YEAH, SO WE’VE HAD GREAT CUSTOMERS AND IT’S ALLOWED US TO DO THE NEW FACILITY. IT’S A TWELVE THOUSAND SQUARE FOOT FACILITY RIGHT OFF THE INTERSTATE AT TOWER CITY. THE OLD FACILITY WE DIDN’T HAVE ANY, A TON OF PARTS AREA FOR WAREHOUSING OR WHATEVER. THIS FACILITY WE HAVE OVER FIVE TIMES THE SQUARE FOOTAGE FOR THAT, SO NOW WE’VE ADDED SIX EMPLOYEES SO WE CAN ADD BETTER SERVICE, BETTER PARTS, JUST THE OVERALL SERVICE TO THE CUSTOMER BETTER.

AND FOLKS CAN COME AND ACTUALLY SEE THIS FOR THEMELVES?

Zane Erickson: YEAH, DECEMBER THIRD WE’RE HAVING AN OPEN HOUSE FROM NINE TO THREE WE’LL HAVE INDUSTRY REPS HERE TO ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS AS WELL AS A TILE SEMINAR IN THE MORNING.

AND IF FOLKS NEED MORE INFORMATION JUST JUMP ON THE WEBSITE.

CORRECT. YUP. NORTHSTAR DASH AG DOT COM. OR GIVE US A CALL AT 701-361-4790.

WELL THANKS SO MUCH AND CONGRATULATIONS.

YEAH, THANK YOU, THANKS FOR HAVING US.

ZANE ERICKSON JOINING US HERE WITH NORTH STAR AG.

STILL AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, THIS TIME OF YEAR, ONE SOUTHWEST MINNESOTA DAIRY CAN’T KEEP UP WITH DEMAND FOR A POPULAR HOLIDAY DRINK.

A SOUTHEASTERN MINNESOTA FAMILY DAIRY IS BRINGING BACK OLD-FASHIONED SERVICE.

THE KAPPERS PRODUCE, PROCESS, PACKAGE AND DISTRIBUTE THEIR OWN DAIRY PRODUCTS, RATHER THAN SENDING THE RAW PRODUCT TO A LARGER CO-OP.

THE BIG RED BARN WAS BUILT IN THE 1800’S FOR HORSES, AND CONVERTED TO A DAIRY BARN. BUT IT HAD BEEN SITTING VACANT FOR ABOUT 40 YEARS BEFORE THE KAPPERS BOUGHT IT IN 1987, WHERE THEY MILK ABOUT FIFTY COWS.

ONE OF THEIR HOLIDAY SPECIALTIES IS EGGNOG THEY MAKE WITH REAL EGGS AND VANILLA.

Lucas Kappers: EVERY YEAR WE’VE DONE EGGNOGG AND IT’S BEEN A HIT. WE’RE ALWAYS SHORT, WHICH IS A GOOD THING TO HAVE. BUT YEAH, IT GOES OVER REALLY WELL, AND IT’S SOMETHING WE PERSONALLY ALL LIKE TOO.

THE KAPPERS EVEN OFFER OLD-FASHIONED HOME DELIVERY OF FOOD STAPLES, WITH MILK IN BOTTLES, IN THE ROCHESTER AND CHATFIELD AREAS, AND THE TWIN CITIES.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK’S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND YOU CAN FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.



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